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Horse & Rider
  • Competition Safe Remedies for you and your Horse

  • Rider Hope Beerling with her healthy horse
  • 9 Ways To Keep Your Dog Safe During Hot Weather

    by Fiona Lane January 30, 2024

    9 Ways to keep your dog safe this summer - tips for managing dehydration & heat exhaustion.

    When the hot summer weather arrives it's important to take extra steps to ensure puppies and dogs are kept cool and safe. While we humans can voice our discomfort, dogs rely on us to recognize the signs of dehydration and heat exhaustion and take steps to protect them. So here are our 9 top tips for keeping dogs safe during hot weather, including links to some of the remedies we make that can help when your dog needs extra support.

    1. Timing Is Everything

    Avoid walking your dog when the temperatures are at their hottest – typically between 11am and 6pm. Hot pavements and beaches can lead to burnt paws, and hot weather can quickly cause dehydration, or worse still, heat exhaustion which can be fatal. 

    2. Go Easy On Exercise

    While it might seem like a great idea to have a dog jog alongside as you run or cycle, it’s not always suitable for their bodies. Dogs are made to sprint then stop rather than run continuously over long distances. Because their loyalty outweighs their endurance – they fear being left behind by their pack (that’s you!) more than they fear collapsing from exhaustion - they'll continue to run, sometimes until they literally drop. Too much continuous running could also be a contributing factor to degenerative back and hip issues as they age, so it really is better to leave the long distance running to the human members of the family.

    3. Stay Swim Safe

    The same applies to having your dog swim long distances beside a kayak. Unfortunately this leaves the dog with two choices – keep swimming until they can’t swim anymore, or face their worst fear - which is being separated from their pack. If your dog loves to swim, try to keep it shore-based so they can get to shallow water when needed.

    4. Keep Them Groomed

    A shorter coat can help keep dogs cooler in the summer months, however remember that their fur also protects them from the sun, so ask the groomer not to go too short!

    5. Be Their Hydration Station

    If you’re heading out with your dog, take an extra water bottle just for them and offer them water frequently. When at home, refill their water bowl regularly as bacteria can turn a water bowl into a Petrie dish within hours on a hot summer day.

    6. Keep Cool

    Dogs can overheat quickly and without much warning, so always make sure they have a shady, breezy spot to lounge in both in the garden at home, and when you stop in somewhere while out and about. If you’re leaving your dog inside your home on a hot day, move their bed to the coolest spot in the house, and try to leave some windows open to create a breeze - being mindful to keep your home secure too of course!

    7. Make DIY Frozen Treats

    Grab an ice cream container and add water, a dash of salt or a smear of marmite/vegemite and some chopped carrots or treats. Once frozen, give it to your dog to lick in the shade – it’ll cool them down and keep them entertained for a while too.

    8. Do Not Leave Dogs In Cars

    Leaving your dog in a car without ventilation is a crime. Even with the windows down a little, the temperature inside a car can quickly reach deadly levels, even on days that don’t seem very hot to you. Parking under a tree isn’t the answer either as, over time, the sun will move exposing the car to heat.  

     9. Try These Natural Remedies

    • Dehydration & Heat Exhaustion: keep a bottle of BioPet Gastric This remedy restores balance to the digestive tract.
    • Sunstroke: try our First Aid Plus – Pets It supports a normal immune response to pain, minor swelling and inflammation that can occur in soft tissue.
    • Sun Management: For pets with pink noses, ears or skin, use Sol Plus – Pets to assist with sun management. It’s an oral remedy which is much easier to administer than creams and lotions!
    • Joint support: BioPet Joints supports dogs (and cats) showing signs of joint stiffness due to age, wear and tear or injury.
    • Staying Home Alone: our Feeling Lonely remedy supports dogs and cats who feel distress when left home alone.
    We've also got tips on natural ways to keep your dogs and cats flea & tick free, and how to manage summer skin conditions

     

    Be Your Dog’s Best Friend

    Your dog needs you to protect them from danger and ill health, especially during the hottest days of summer. A cool dog is a happy dog, and there’s no better way to show your love for your favourite 4-legged friend than by keeping them safe and comfortable all summer long.

     

     

    General Disclaimer

    Always follow dosing instructions. Our remedies are formulated to support the natural immune system of horses, pets, and livestock. We do not claim to treat, medicate or cure any health conditions. If you are worried an animal may be in pain or suffering please contact your veterinarian.


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